Blog

April 6 to April 12 2015

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Welcome to the first week of our Performance program. Purpose is what guides our training program. Through purposeful training you can improve your health and performance in the way that is most meaningful to your needs and aspirations.

The Fitness option will aid in helping you improve your health and fitness.  This is a great option for beginners. It is an effective way to build a great base and to create an awareness for what works best for you and your body.

The Performance option has a greater degree of complexity. You’ll be exposed to the best that the world of strength and conditioning has to offer. We integrate olympic weightlifting, plyometrics, gymnastics, etc.

Each month we will be concentrating on a certain skill or movement. We will go through progressions throughout the month to allow you to learn and master this certain movement.  Double unders (skipping) will be the movement for April.

 

Monday 04/06/15

A. 5 minutes – Skipping/Double Under technique

B.
4 sets
3 Back Squats @20X1
rest 180sec

C.
4 sets
6-8 Dumbbell pause Bench Press @1212
rest 30sec
6-8 Dumbbell Bent Row @20X1
rest 120sec

D.
Performance
3 sets for time:
60 Double Unders (or 120 Single Skips)
20 Chin Ups
20 Wall Balls (14/20)
rest walk 120sec

Fitness
3 sets for time:
80 Single Skips
12 Ring Rows
12 Wall Balls (10/14)
rest walk 90sec

 

Tuesday 04/07/15

A.
Performance
Jerk 2, 2, 2, 1, 1  (2s @80%, 1s @85%)
rest 90sec

Fitness
4 sets
5 Strict Press @21X0 (moderate weight ~55%)
rest 90sec

B.
Performance
Every minute on the minute for 10 minutes
1 Power Clean + 1 Hang Power Clean

Fitness
Every minute on the minute for 5 minutes
5 Barbell Romanian Deadlift

C.
Performance
3 sets
Row 20 calories
10 floor Dumbbell Shoulder Press
20 Box Jumps (20”/24”) (step down)
10 KB Swings (35/53)
rest 1:1

Fitness
3 sets
Row 10 calories
10 ball slams
10 box jumps (16”/20”) (step down)
10 russian KB Swings (26/35)
rest 1:1

 

Wednesday 04/08/15

REST DAY

Active Rest: Run, Bike, Swim, Mobility
Open Gym at 12:15pm

 

Thursday 04/09/15

A.
Performance
10 sets – every 45sec
1 Front Squat @20X1 (75% of 1RM) – Work on speed from bottom.

Fitness
Every minute on the minute for 5 minutes
3 Front Squats @20X1 (moderate weight ~55%)

B.
Performance
6 sets – every 2 min
3 Deadlifts (start at 75%)

Fitness
3 sets – every 2min
3 Deadlift (~55%)

C.
4 sets
10 Strict Toes to Bar
10 Plate Chops (ea)
rest as needed

 

Friday 04/10/15

A.
Performance
Power Snatch
In 10 minutes build to a heavy single (not a 1RM)

Fitness
10 minutes – Dumbbell Snatch technique

B.
Performance
Every minute on the minute for 8 minutes
3 Touch and Go Power Snatch (70-75% of #1)

Fitness
3 sets
As many reps as possible in 60 seconds – push ups
rest 120sec

C.
Performance
3 sets
As many reps as possible in 60sec – clapping push ups
rest 120sec

Fitness
3 sets for time:
300m row
10 alternating Dumbbell Snatch
10 Ring Rows
rest 120sec

D.
Performance
3 sets for time:
500m row
10 Touch & Go Clean (75/115 – full clean)
15 Ring Rows
rest 120sec

 

Saturday 04/11/15

A. 10 minutes – Double Under technique

B.
Performance
“Kelly”
5 sets for time:
400m Run
30 Box Jumps
30 Wall Balls

Fitness
“Half Kelly”
5 sets for time:
200m Run
15 Box Jumps
15 Wall Balls

C. 10 minute Plank – every break perform 15 hollow rocks

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What is Tempo Training?

As we get ready to launch our weekly training programming for our Performance class; I would like to explain what tempo training is and why I think it’s one of the best ways to get stronger. There is a lot of research behind it and all of the top strength coaches in the world use it as a tool.

Tempo training allows for you to have a grasp on the time under tension throughout the exercise. Completing 5 repetitions of a movement explosively on the eccentric (descending) and concentric (ascending) portions will not have the same effect as if you pause during a certain stage of the range of motion. Different tempo prescriptions lead to greater training variety and stimulus. This will lead to improved strength gains. Through tempo training we can also improve an athlete’s technique. It allows for the athlete to feel which muscles are activated, and allows them to have better control of their body.

So what does 30X1 mean? Tempo prescriptions are written in a series of four numbers. These numbers represent the time (in seconds) it should take to complete the four stages of a lift. In a program, the tempo follows the number of repetitions prescribed. For example:

Back Squat 5 reps @ 30X1

 

First Number

The first number represents the lowering (eccentric) portion of the lift. Using the above back squat example, the 3 represents the time in seconds it should take you to lower the weight to the bottom position of the movement.

Second Number
The second number represents the amount of time spent in the bottom position of the lift. In the back squat example, the 0 means you should immediately begin your ascent when you reach the bottom position.

Third Number
The third number represents the amount of time it takes to complete the ascending (concentric) portion of the lift. The X signifies that you should explode to the top as quickly as possibly.

Fourth Number
The fourth number represents the amount of time you should pause at the top of the lift. In our back squat example, you should hold the top position for one second prior to starting the next rep.

 

 

How should you count? I realize this is a simple task. However, many people will count to three in one second. To ensure you count properly, use “one thousands” (1-one thousand, 2-one thousand, 3-one thousand).

I would highly recommend for you to try tempo training for a couple of months. You will notice a change with the quality of your movement and an increase in your strength. If you are not sure how to create tempo prescriptions, then follow our weekly training for the Performance class. If you are looking for a program more specific to your needs, please email me in regards of online coaching.

Shayan Vaghayenegar
CSEP-CPT

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Fitness & Weight Lifting Advice for Beginners

Everyone has to start somewhere and it can be slightly overwhelming and at times discouraging. I have spent the past twelve plus years working on my personal fitness goals and also spent two years full time in college earning a Human Kinetics diploma. On this path, personal, professional, and educational experience have taught me a fair bit. Here are some helpful suggestions.

Consistency is the Best Strategy

Most of us, when starting a new exercise regimen, can be overenthusiastic. We want quick results and we may think we can achieve them through quantity. In most cases more is not better. Spending three hours a day, seven days a week training will not help you achieve your fitness goals quickly nor efficiently. As a matter of fact it will result in the complete opposite. Over-training will lead to injury and fatigue, halting your progress and in some cases diminishing your motivation in the long run.

All you need is consistency in the gym. It takes time for your body to adapt and change. You will not manifest your dream body within two weeks of starting training; not even after two months. But you will be very pleased with what you see within twelve months of consistency. By that time exercise will have become a part of your lifestyle; which is not only aesthetically beneficial, but more importantly beneficial for your physical, mental, and emotional health long term.  Achieving your optimal body is a constant work in progress.

Your goal should include resistance training three to four times per week. Obviously things come up in life; travel for work, vacation, illness, etc. The key is, preferably, not to take longer then one week off. Some rest is always necessary to allow the body to recuperate and adapt.

nigel

Strength Training is Key

Strength training will allow for a denser body. Your body will get leaner, but the numbers on the scale might not change. You will be building muscle (no ladies, you aren’t going to look too muscular, but that’s a whole other topic), your bones will be denser, tendons and ligaments will become stronger and body fat will decrease. Your body composition in general will change for the better, and most importantly functional strength will improve.

It does not help to just show up at the gym and go through the motions. This will not allow for the amazing results you demand of yourself. You need to push yourself in many ways. You need to keep close to perfect form at all times, push yourself to get another 1 or 2 more reps, and challenge yourself to learn new exercises and variations.

Strength training will enable your physique to improve, shaping your body and creating natural body curves. This can not be achieved through cardiovascular exercise. Follow a structured strength program and your body will be thankful.

It Becomes Easier as Time Passes

At the beginning, things might feel awkward. Coordination and rhythm might be lacking. Maintaining proper mechanics and form can be challenging, especially as the load increases. The mind-muscle connection will take time to cue. Trust me, this will change for the better and the sense of achievement will become addicting.

Every training session will allow for your neuromuscular capabilities to increase. Every week the movements will feel more and more natural. Make sure you are using strict form throughout every exercise. Your nervous system will be mapping out motor programs so they become somewhat automatic and you want these to be perfect. This becomes crucial as you start taking sets closer to failure repetition.

Outside Pushing

You Can Not Out-Train a Poor Diet

  The following can not be emphasized enough. A proper nutrition plan is more important then any training routine. You need to be consistently consuming the proper amount of calories and proper ratio of fats, protein, and carbohydrates. Most people consume too many calories and most importantly too much sugar. You should be eating five small to medium size meals through out the day every day. Don’t get me wrong, you need to enjoy life and have the odd bowl of ice-cream or slice of pizza. Just make sure you are not sabotaging your hard work in the gym with a poor diet.
Shayan Vaghayenegar
CSEP-CPT
shayan@ap-fitness.com

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